eraser
schedule logo

Schedule

Users

Login

schedule logo

Schedule

Users

Login

Ms. Leber

May 6, 2023

Adult Writing Classes

The Secret to Career Advancement: Strong Writing Skills

Learn to Write Now was founded on a straightforward principle: even the most talented, technically skilled people can fall short if they lack verbal and written communication skills. Writing and communication skills play a significant role in determining success in academic and professional life.

Effective communication is the cornerstone of any successful career. Crafting emails, reports, proposals, and presentations requires writing clearly and concisely. On average, miscommunication through bad writing results in $400 Billion in business losses annually, not to mention the time and resources lost to correct or revise. Over the years, 75-80% of polled employers consistently rank strong writing skills (alongside leadership and teamwork) as a significant decision in hiring new candidates. Hiring managers look specifically for employees who demonstrate effective communication, critical thinking, and problem-solving. Strengthening ELA skills improves all three.

Strong ELA skills are valuable, marketable skills employers look for when hiring because bad writers take longer to write and require more supervision and oversight, taking time away from already busy managers. Employees with effective communication skills are more productive and persuasive than their poor writing counterparts. In the eyes of employers, good writing directly translates into productivity and profits.

Advanced reading and writing skills relate to effective critical thinking. Clear, cohesive writing demonstrates the ability to analyze, evaluate, and make decisions based on evidence, all needed for problem-solving in the workplace. Strong writers are typically well-organized and detail-oriented, meaning they recognize patterns, catch mistakes, produce faster, and manage their time more efficiently. Employees displaying these qualities are the most likely to advance quickly into leadership roles.

Are you looking to sharpen your professional and workplace writing skills? Learn more about LTWN’s Business Writing Basics course. In this 8-week program, we break down the keys to effective communication, strengthen writing and proofreading skills, and practice crafting the types of real-world documents that employees read and write every day. 

Put yourself on the path to career advancement by registering for the next available session today!
https://www.learntowritenow.com/schedule Select: Adult

FB logoTwitter logoInstagram LogoTIKTOK LogoWA logo
layer 100
layer copy

Lastest Articles

Applying Metacognitive Skills to ELA

Ms. Leber

February 12, 2024

In the LTWN’s last blog post, we discussed metacognition (also known as metacognitive skills), more commonly defined as “thinking about thinking.” Metacognition is the practice of self-reflection on one’s learning, most notably making connections to prior knowledge, identifying strategies, and applying skills to successfully and effectively complete tasks. It requires deep, complex thinking and application of methods, sometimes through trial and error, until students identify the best methods for their learning style or task.

Metacognition: The Secret Skill to Effective Learning

Ms. Leber

February 12, 2024

In a time when standardized tests direct curriculums, everything is rushed and teachers do the heavy lifting for students. Information is spoon fed at mach speed to be memorized and regurgitated on one exam or another, either in the classroom or school-wide. But this isn’t learning, which explains why reading, writing, and math scores are at historic lows.

Good Handwriting = Higher Scores in School

Ms. Leber

December 15, 2023

Thanks to the availability of devices, typing has become a necessary skill for academic success. But good old fashioned handwriting is still an incredibly important skill for students to master. Research indicates that students with good handwriting perform better in math and reading, and writing by hand improves cognitive performance more than typing.