eraser
schedule logo

Schedule

Users

Login

schedule logo

Schedule

Users

Login

Ms. Leber

May 6, 2023

College Admission Essays

Guarantee Acceptance by Starting College Essays Early

As part of the regular college application process, the average high school senior will write upwards of 12-20 application essays. Thanks in part to the increase in first-year applicants (up 26% from pre-pandemic enrollment, according to CommonApp) and the fiercely competitive nature of the process, most colleges ask for multiple essays upon application. These supplemental essays are used to determine “demonstrated interest” by the student and the likelihood that they will accept an offer of admission. These essays ensure the college sees students holistically beyond grades and test scores. Supplemental essays are a first impression that can make or break a student’s chances of receiving that coveted acceptance letter from their dream school. 

Navigating the ins and outs of the application process can be overwhelming enough for students and parents, and many don’t consider the amount of time drafting and revising dozens of essays will take. With the added stress and commitments of senior year responsibilities, starting this process early is critical to success. Starting early gives students ample time to write reflective and effective essays demonstrating their interest, skills, personality, and goals. These are the selling points colleges look for to ensure potential students are a good fit for their programs and campus culture. Beginning as early as junior year means students have the necessary time to understand the process, learn the tricks of the trade, and write stellar essays that are sure to impress admissions officers.

Is your high school senior overwhelmed by the idea of writing college essays? Our College Admissions Essays Workshops (Pre-CAE, CAE I, and CAE II) are designed to help your student navigate this complex process by laying out the expectations, breaking down the prompts, and teaching the best practices for writing admissions essays that translate into acceptance letters. In these workshops, students have the time, coaching, and encouragement to find their voice, hone their essays, and cultivate the resources they need to apply to ultra-reach and reach colleges confidently.

Not sure where to start? Use our helpful questionnaire to determine your individual needs then learn more about our College Application Essays Workshops. Give your high school student an edge by registering for the next available class today! 
You can also watch a Video on what we offer!

FB logoTwitter logoInstagram LogoTIKTOK LogoWA logo
layer 100
layer copy

Lastest Articles

Applying Metacognitive Skills to ELA

Ms. Leber

February 12, 2024

In the LTWN’s last blog post, we discussed metacognition (also known as metacognitive skills), more commonly defined as “thinking about thinking.” Metacognition is the practice of self-reflection on one’s learning, most notably making connections to prior knowledge, identifying strategies, and applying skills to successfully and effectively complete tasks. It requires deep, complex thinking and application of methods, sometimes through trial and error, until students identify the best methods for their learning style or task.

Metacognition: The Secret Skill to Effective Learning

Ms. Leber

February 12, 2024

In a time when standardized tests direct curriculums, everything is rushed and teachers do the heavy lifting for students. Information is spoon fed at mach speed to be memorized and regurgitated on one exam or another, either in the classroom or school-wide. But this isn’t learning, which explains why reading, writing, and math scores are at historic lows.

Good Handwriting = Higher Scores in School

Ms. Leber

December 15, 2023

Thanks to the availability of devices, typing has become a necessary skill for academic success. But good old fashioned handwriting is still an incredibly important skill for students to master. Research indicates that students with good handwriting perform better in math and reading, and writing by hand improves cognitive performance more than typing.